SDL Episode90

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Secure Digital Life #90

Recorded on November 27, 2018 at G-Unit Studios in Rhode Island!

Episode Audio

Coming soon!

Hosts

  • Doug White
    Cybersecurity professor, President of Secure Technology, and Security Weekly network host.
  • Announcements

    • If you are interested in quality over quantity and having meaningful conversations instead of just a badge scan, join us April 1-3, at Disney's Contemporary Resort for InfoSec World 2019 where you can connect and network with like-minded individuals in search of actionable information. Use the registration code OS19-SECWEEK for 15% off the Main Conference or World Pass.
    • Join us for our Webcast with Chronicle entitled "Intelligence Powered Malware Hunting". This webcast will be held December 5th @3-4pm EST. Go to securityweekly.com/chronicle to register now!
    • Go to https://go.stealthbits.com/2019trends to register for stealthBITS webcast "Emerging & Continuing Trends in 2019: Privacy Regulations, Active Directory Security & Machine Learning" for an in-depth discussion from Gabriel Gumbs and myself. You can also view their assessment at: https://www.stealthbits.com/assessment

    Interview: Bill Ottman, CEO & Co-Founder at Minds

    Bill Ottman is the CEO & Co-Founder of Minds
    Bill founded Minds in 2011 with the goal of bringing a free, open source and sustainable social network to the world. He co-founded multiple viral media organizations, holds a fellowship at Boston Global Forum and serves on the Advisory Board of Code To Inspire, a non-profit building coding schools for women in Afghanistan. He graduated from University of Vermont with a BA in English.

    Topic:Internet Censorship

    What does privacy even mean? I know what it means to me but I think it's a really complex issue for most people. I mean, what if you take a nude photo of yourself. What if you send it to a bunch of people. Ok, you sent it. But what if someone steals it? Wow! Very different feeling.

    How do we manage behavior without violating privacy? So, what is too much? What are those strange smells coming from the apartment next door? Is it Dahmer or is it just someone who really likes Surstromming? How do we find out? The 4th Amendment of the United States Constitution says "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized." This amendment was specifically focused on privacy (in the 18th century) and has been debated and interpreted over and over in the Supreme and other courts. Today, privacy has become a very complex issue (not that it wasn't before) as we add social media, tweets, a camera in every pocket and on every lamp post, etc.

    Maybe the end of privacy is coming from the internet angle. Arthur C. Clarke (one of the most visionary writers ever) and Stephen Baxter wrote a book called "The Light of Other Days" which was essentially about the end of privacy and the impact on society of no one being able to hide anything. In many ways, that's a good thing but it's also a terrible thing. I wish Kurt Vonnegut had written a book about this but he didn't.

    Why not just stop all crime with a drone in every airspace and a camera in every pot?

    But, I can stop almost all crime. Full surveilance, a la 1984, you can't do a thing and you better work out in front of the camera every day while saluting the flag and smiling at El Presidente.

    • How do we protect ourselves from trolls then?
    • How do I protect myself and my kid online from say an bully. Should their be an age limit for anonymity?
    • How do we address global psychology since we can't really do it locally?



    References: Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell. Secker and Warburg (1949). Animal Farm by George Orwell. Secker and Warburg (1945). The Light of Other Days by Arthur C. Clarke and Stephen Baxter. Tor Books (2000) 0-312-87199-6