ES Episode140

Recorded June 5, 2019 at G-Unit Studios in Rhode Island!

Episode Audio

Hosts

  • Paul Asadoorian
    Embedded device security researcher, security podcaster, and CEO of Active Countermeasures .
  • John Strand
    Security analyst, Founder of Black Hills Information Security, and CTO of Offensive Countermeasures.
  • Jeff Man
    Cryptanalyst,
    infosec analyst, pioneering ex-NSA pen tester, PCI specialist,
    Tribe of Hackers, & InfoSec Curmudgeon.
    Currently a Sr. InfoSec Consultant for Online Business Systems.
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    Contents

    Interview: Charles Thompson, Viavi

    Charles Thompson is the Senior Director of Product Management at Viavi
    Charles Thompson, Sr. Director of Product Management at VIAVI Solutions, has a career spanning 20 years in the IT space specializing in using wire-data to assist SecOps and NetOps teams with management, analysis, and protection of critical applications, services, and data. At VIAVI, Charles leads product management for the enterprise security and performance management solutions allowing earlier detection and faster, more comprehensive responses to security threats. Prior to VIAVI, Charles held various leadership roles in product management and services at Network Instruments. To learn more about VIAVI Solutions security solutions and to access a variety of premium whitepapers and assets, visit securityweekly.com/viavi.

    Topic: Charles will discuss the importance of response/remediation in a strong security strategy and the role wire-data plays in having the forensic detail needed to identify a breach, understand scope of impact, and confirm restoration of network performance to pre-incident baseline.

    Segment Resources:


    Topic Segment: Defending Your Environment Against Major Microsoft Vulnerabilities

    Discussion point before we begin: What defines a "major" Microsoft vulnerability?

    1. Discovery - Scoping the problem is just one part of determining just how big of a problem you have if you even have a problem at all. The discovery must be an ongoing process, constantly looking for the known bad states, notifying the right people, and implementing a fix. This also means both externally and internally, whatever that means to you today.
    2. Temporary Countermeasures - These can vary, but should be considered a when Microsoft has a "major vulnerability", it is more likely attackers will go after this weakness vs. others.
    3. Be Resilient - This is extremely hard for large enterprises today, most of which have legacy systems and architecture that prevents them from moving fast. The faster you can build an environment, test a patch or fix, deploy it to production, the more resilient you become. I realize that various levels of resiliency may exist in your environment, keep focused on your most critical assets and most sensitive data first.
    4. I'd want two things - If I were to be in charge of defending a Windows environment, I'd want two capabilities: 1) The ability to run scenarios through the environment at any time, pointing out exposures. For major MS vulnerabilities, there would be a constant simulation running identifying the exposure 2) Configuration management would be critical to my plans, the ability to safely make a change across an environment with 10,000+ systems exists, and I'd want it.


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