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Paul's Security Weekly Episode #653 - May 28, 2020

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1. Interview - 2020 MITRE ATT&CK Malware Trends - 06:00 PM

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2. News - Security News w/Ed Skoudis - 07:00 PM

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Paul Asadoorian's Content:

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  1. Pi-hole 4.4.0 - Remote Code Execution (Authenticated)
  2. NSA warns Russia-linked APT group is exploiting Exim flaw since 2019
  3. Meet unc0ver, the new jailbreak that pops shelland much moreon any iPhone
  4. OpenSSH to deprecate SHA-1 logins due to security risk | ZDNet
  5. Attack Pattern Detection and Prediction - I'm not buying it: It is believed that security researchers can use attack pattern recognition or detection methods as an approach that can provide precautions to prevent future attacks.
  6. Computer science student discovers privacy flaws in security and doorbell cameras - Help Net Security
  7. Thermal Imaging as Security Theater - Schneier on Security
  8. New fuzzing tool for USB drivers uncovers bugs in Linux, macOS, Windows - Help Net Security
  9. (99+) Six musts for building secure software | LinkedIn - This is so much more difficult today: Escaping rules are specific to the tech you’re working with. Four ways to ensure your code meets requirements to protect against XSS are a) never insert untrusted data into your database; b) don’t try to write your own escaping code and add the HttpOnly flag wherever you set cookies; c) set up a content security policy. For more on encoding and escaping, I recommend OWASP’s Cross-Site Scripting Prevention Cheat Sheet. Its not just "user input", its any data that can be changed that ends up getting passed to the server. The DOM, cookies, XML entities, etc... all have the potential to lead to XSS. Many of these vulnerabilities will not be uncovered by scanning, of any kind. They require a human to test the app and determine the implications. Sure, you can get rid of many of the vulnerabilities, but I believe some will remain unless testers are extremely diligent.
  10. House pulls vote on FISA bill | SC Media
  11. Hacking Team Founder: Hacking Team is Dead - Wow, analogies: A former employee previously told Motherboard that Hacking Team without Vincenzetti is “like Nirvana without Kurt Cobain.”
  12. NSA warns of new Sandworm attacks on email servers | ZDNet - Also known as "Sandworm," this group has been hacking Exim servers since August 2019 by exploiting a critical vulnerability tracked as CVE-2019-10149, the NSA said in a security alert [PDF] shared today with ZDNet. And NSA is making a big deal about this now because, cats out of the bag. Tin foil hat theory: NSA knew about this vulnerability long before it was made public either by acquiring it by some means, developing it themselves, or by observing GRU using it and, in turn, using it as well until such time the vulnerability was made public.
  13. Vulnerability Disclosures Drop in Q1 for First Time in a Decade
  14. Israel s national cyber chief warns of rising of cyber-warfare - OMG! Really: Unna pointed out that the attempt to hack into Israel’s water systems marked the first time in modern history that “we can see something like this aiming to cause damage to real life and not to IT or data. So we can just leave out all other previous hacks that caused damage in real life, like, uh, for one Stuxnet, which is well-known to be partly developed by Isreal. Or how about hacks to the phone systems in the 1960's? None of those caused any damage in the real world? People will say the same thing about Stuxnet, its just not true. In fact, the first hack ever recorded actually made an impact (audio conversations over wireless) in the real world, okay not physical damage, but affected the real world as audio was injected into the stream.
  15. 3 SMB Cybersecurity Myths Debunked - Lots of Myth debunking going on, meh: No. 1: Only large organizations face public scrutiny. No. 2: After a cyberattack, big businesses have less downtime and recover faster. No. 3: SMB leaders are lax about security and data privacy. Look, admitting your care about security in a survey is vastly different than actually doing it (or even knowing how).
  16. Hackers Compromise Cisco Servers Via SaltStack Flaws - Two Cisco products incorporate a version of SaltStack that is running the vulnerable salt-master service. The first is Cisco Modeling Labs Corporate Edition (CML), which gives users a virtual sandbox environment to design and configure network topologies. The second is Cisco Virtual Internet Routing Lab Personal Edition (VIRL-PE), used to design, configure and operate networks using versions of Cisco’s network operating systems. Hackers were able to successfully exploit the flaws incorporated in the latter product, resulting in the compromise of six VIRL-PE backend servers, according to Cisco. Those servers are: us-1.virl.info, us-2.virl.info, us-3.virl.info, us-4.virl.info, vsm-us-1.virl.info and vsm-us-2.virl.info.


3. Interview - "Burn-In: A Novel of the Real Robotic Revolution" - 09:00 PM

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